Challenging Group Think

By: Victor Normand

According to the Urban Dictionary, the expression “Do the math,” means to figure something out. To come to a solution or conclusion based on other facts. But my training, going back to my earliest experiences in the world of work literally means to do the math. Whenever I read an article with numbers in it, I do the math often discovering that something just doesn’t “add up” or that the verbiage doesn’t match the math. Or that the numbers have become group think detached from reality.

Tax Reform

The latest disconnect between the word on the street and the math has to do with tax reform. The group think within much of the housing community, including the National Association of REALTORS® has to do with changes to the mortgage interest deduction “eviscerating” the program and bringing home sales down and endangering the economy.

First of all, nothing yet has been turned into a bill let alone passed into law, so injecting panic into the marketplace is chilling and ill advised.

Secondly, even considering the most severe reduction from $1.0 million to $5 hundred thousand in mortgage debt, the reality is it will affect very few new homebuyers, mostly those buying big houses with big incomes. The average mortgage debt nationally is less than $225,000 and even in high cost markets, having a buyer’s tax liability rise by a few thousand dollars is not likely to be the go or no-go metric on a home purchase.

Down Payment Requirement

This still keeps coming up. Common knowledge among first time home buyers, reinforced by the printed word is that it takes 20% of the purchase price in cash to qualify for a mortgage. One of the Agents in the office asked a friend why she thought that way. Her response was that every time she went to her favorite real estate website and checked in with a mortgage calculator, the assumed number for down payment was 20%.

In actuality, according to the National Association of REALTORS®, about 60% of first-time homebuyers put down less than 6% on a home mortgage and in Massachusetts, there are programs that allow even less for qualified buyers.

Student Loan Debt

Seventy-five percent of all student loans are government loans and government loans provide for re-payment based on income which means that monthly payments are not necessarily tied to the amount of the loan but rather as low as 10% of the borrower’s income.

Lenders make loans in part based on debt to income ratios though it would be more accurate to say debt “service” to income ratios. From the lenders perspective, the amount of unsecured student loans a borrower has doesn’t matter but rather how much they pay each month on those loans.

Challenge everything; it’s a good practice and you will be surprised at how often the numbers don’t add up. It’s not a grand conspiracy; perhaps the media or word on the street picks up on a small or partial truth and runs with it because it seems to make sense and it very well may sometimes. Don’t be satisfied until you can relate the information to your personal circumstance. While the Resident Experts(sm) are not lenders or tax accountants, they know when you should be talking to one.