Am I a Luddite?

By: Victor Normand

ludditeA recent Time Magazine article by Lisa Eadicicco and Matt Vella exposed the struggles of smart home technologies to capture consumer interest. Devices to control air conditioning, lighting, pantry and refrigerator inventories, home security and the like using internet connectivity seemed like the next big innovation. But it has not happened. Various technical reasons were cited, but mostly the failure to establish a basic rationale for having such technology in the minds of consumers seems to be the problem. It will no doubt come about in the fullness of time, but for now I find myself cheering for the consumers who just said “no thanks.”

So now I began to wonder have I reached the point in my life where new technologies need to be stopped or at least slowed down? Is there a movement out there that I should join as a modern day Luddite? The Luddites belonged to a protest movement opposed to the advancing machine age in England, early in the nineteenth century. General Ludd, as he was known, inspired the movement that saw weaving equipment smashed and factories burned in protest to jobs being lost to technology. Though Ludd himself apparently never existed, his name if not his actual cause carries on.

For some reason, the rejection of smart home technologies made me feel good. Even though I’ve known since the third grade that you cannot stop progress and most often change is good, if not inevitable. My third grade experience came to me in the form of a story told by Miss O’Leary to her class about an elderly aunt who passed up an opportunity to trade in her stocks in a Westfield buggy whip company for stock in a mostly unknown company called “International Business Machines.” Her aunt reasoned it was anyone’s guess who knew what business machines were all about, but surely there would always be a need for buggy whips!

Miss O’Leary’s story may have been apocryphal, but of the 40 buggy whip companies then in Westfield (still known today as “Whip City”) only one exists. This shows of course, that despite the decimation of an industry by technology, it is possible for the old ways to carry on, in a fashion. Nonetheless, the story obviously made an impression on me. And the truth is, the Luddites were not wholly against weaving machines. Their protest was against manufacturers who used machines in a “fraudulent and deceitful manner” to circumvent standard labor practices. They too recognized that technological change was unstoppable.

So, my rant against technology is in fact using technology to make the point. Also, it has been suggested that the ultimate intent of the Luddite movement was to make a machine to destroy other machines.  When you think about it, mashing a weaving machine is a much easier concept than attacking the “cloud,” or is it? Protest is good and technology has its place, prominent as it is, but I for one have no problem maintaining a paper grocery list.